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More from Eleanor Janega

The Execution Dock and Blackwall Point

Following a rise of piracy from the fifteenth century, those pirates captured were hung at the Execution Dock, and then had their bodies displayed as a warning at Blackwall Point.

Gropecunt Lane

Frederick’s Place, in the City of London, used to be called Gropecunt Lane in the medieval period due to its many brothels. As nearby Milk Street and Bread Street can attest, medieval Londoners valued pragmatism above all in their naming of streets.

Whoresnest: the story of the Bankside Stews

Until the C16th, the area next to the river in Lambeth was home to the so-called Bankside Stews, a collection of bathhouses that doubled as brothels.

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The Lord Napier Graffiti Pub, Hackney Wick, London

For about twenty years, not a single pint was been pulled in The Lord Napier pub, located near to the Hackney Wick overground station. The pub was licensed in 1868 under the name The White’s Arms and was then advertised for sale, whereupon its news owners changed its name to The Lord Napier. During the twentieth century, the pub appeared in the local and national news as the site of numerous robberies and assaults. After its closure in 1995, the former pub attracted squat parties, became known as a destination for illegal raves in the early 2000s and began to be covered in graffiti. In 2016, artist Aida Wilde commissioned 29 local street artists as part of a 48-hour takeover of the building as a ‘symbol of protest against [the] gentrification’ which was happening in the local area. The pub has been attracting tourists to its ever changing exterior ever since it was reimagined with its iconic graffiti makeover. After attracting new ownership, the pub is expected to go through an extensive programme of refurbishment.