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More from Alexander Davidson

The House of the Future at Olympia London

This viewpoint focusses on a futuristic vision for plastics in architecture and interior design: Alison and Peter Smithson‘s House of the Future, which was shown at the Daily Mail Ideal Home Show at the London Olympia Exhibition Centre in 1956. The exhibition structure, containing everything from chairs made of fibreglass to bedding fashioned out of Nylon, popularised an aesthetic for the materials’ use in architectural and visual design which has lasted until the present day.

The Plastic Eggcups by Camden Lock

In this viewpoint, I tell the story of Terry Farrell & Partners’ TV-AM building (1981-83), a maverick television studios near Camden Lock. The TV-AM building, which – as the name suggests – was home to one Britain’s first breakfast television programmes, is associated with the architectural style of postmodernism and with colour in architecture and interior design. The building was substantially refurbished by architects Jacobs Webber in 2012-13 and is now home to Viacom International.

Winterton House and Plastic Cladding

The viewpoint deals with four Greater London Council housing blocks – two in Tower Hamlets and a second pair in Westminster, where the architects employed an experimental plastics building system in their design and construction. More latterly, the buildings were involved in the “Homes for Votes” scandal in the 1980s, which has received renewed attention in the light of the Grenfell Tower disaster.

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‘Blind Beggar and his Dog’, Elisabeth Frink. Cranbrook estate, Bethnal Green

By Rosamund Lily West. Elisabeth Frink’s Blind Beggar and his Dog’ was installed in 1963 outside the bungalows built for the elderly on Bethnal Green’s Cranbrook estate. This viewpoint looks at the significance of the blind beggar for the early residents of the Cranbrook estate and the old Metropolitan Borough of Bethnal Green.