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More from Eleanor Janega

The London Stone

No one knows exactly where the London Stone came from, but in the medieval and early modern periods it was an important symbolic place, as well as a way of marking out addresses in the city.

The George and Tabard Inns

The George is a seventeenth-century coaching inn that stands near the site of the old Tabard Inn, where the Canterbury Tales begins. Travel back and forth between London and Canterbury happened for religious reason as well as pleasure.

Apothecaries’ Hall

The oldest extant guildhall London belongs to the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries. Originally a part of the Grocers’ Guild they split off to form their own society as ideas about medicine changed.

More in United Kingdom

2 Willow Road

This viewpoint will explore architect Ernő Goldfinger’s integration into contemporary British literary circles – far beyond his (frequently misreported) connection to Ian Fleming’s famous villain – and will use 2 Willow Road’s status as a National Trust property to consider how a once-iconoclastic modernism has been reclaimed as national heritage.