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More from Ella Sbaraini

A Fierce Argument over the Burial of a Suicide

In 1849, the reverend of Cottenham, and the Cambridgeshire coroner, had a fierce argument about whether a man of the parish could be given a proper Christian burial. Why? Because he had taken his own life. Learn about beliefs surrounding the burial of suicides in Victorian England.

The Helmshore Riots and Mary Hindle’s Story

In 1826, there were large-scale riots at Helmshore. Half-starving handloom weavers attacked the machines which threatened their livelihoods. Mary Hindle, a local woman, got caught up in this rioting. Learn about her story, and about what eventually drove her to suicide.

‘You ruin’d me forever’: A Suicide Letter at Hyde Park Basin

In 1798, a letter was left at the bank of Hyde Park Basin. Why had it been left there? And why did its author want it to be published? Find out about the struggles of John Cook, the butler to the Marquis of Titchfield, who died here.

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The Barbican and the Making of the Modern Office Building – Pt. 2

The Barbican Redevelopment Scheme, comprising the Barbican Estate, Barbican Arts Centre and the office buildings around London Wall and Moorgate, is well known to people with an affection for twentieth-century architecture, and has become major cultural centre in its own right. Nevertheless, very few people are aware of how a type of plastic manufactured in rural Kent quietly revolutionised the design and construction of modern office building, in particular the curtain-walling systems that enabled open-plan offices. In the second of two viewpoints on the New Barbican, Alexander Davidson tells a story encompassing two office buildings built as part of the Barbican Redevelopment Scheme – Lee House and St Alphage House – and how the plastic Holoplast was manufactured, used in construction, and eventually came to be demonised by the City of London Corporation.