Leave a Reply

More from Lauren Jane Barnett

Canary Warf Underground, a landmark of Horror Cinema

The Arched entrance of Canary Wharf Underground appears in 3 horror films, each with its own take on the area and the underground, but the station really shines in the zombie apocalypse film “28 Weeks Later”. Listen to discover which films set here and to explore a deleted scene from Boyle’s iconic zombie horror.

The Eros Fountain in Horror Cinema

The Eros Fountain in Piccadilly Circus has appeared in more than a dozen horror films, mostly to set the scene in London. But it plays a more important symbolic role in three horror films – Edgar Wright’s 2021 “Last Night in Soho”, Lindsay Shonteff’s “Night After Night After Night”, and Danny Boyle’s “28 Days Later”. Listen to find out what this fountain meant for these three, very different, horror films

The “Shaun of The Dead” Pub!

This unassuming corner building was once the Duke of Argyll Pub, better known as The Winchester, the pub that saved lives in “Shaun of the Dead”. Starring Simon Peg and Nick Frost as two best friends faced with the zombie apocalypse, the film’s stars can only think of one place to shelter from it all: The Winchester. Listen to hear more about the film and the scenes shot here.

More in United Kingdom

The Squatters’ Graffiti at Sutton House, London

Sutton House is the oldest domestic building in Hackney and one of London’s last remaining Tudor houses, having been built in 1535 by Tudor Statesman and Secretary of State to King Henry VIII, Ralph Sadlier. Even though the house is called ‘Sutton House’, it was never the dwelling of Thomas Sutton who actually lived in the house next door. The house was originally called ‘Bryk Place’ and was rested among long open green spaces and near to the town centre of Hackney. The history of the house is complex as, over time, it has been a Tudor manor house, a Victorian school, a Men’s Institute during the First World War, a Trade Unions Office in the 1960s-70s and a punk squat in the 1980s. The house was restored in the early 1990s by the National Trust and opened to the public in 1994. In order to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the squatter’s arrival to Sutton House, the National Trust converted the Squatter’s Room to recreate how it would have looked in 1985 with the help of some of the squatters who had lived there. In the room, visitors can see some of the original graffiti art left by the squatters which includes anti-fascist, anti-Thatcher and feminist political slogans.