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More from John Price

The Everyday Heroes of Postman’s Park – ‘Mother, I saved him… but could not save myself’

Recounts the story of Solomon Gellman, aged eleven, who was run down and killed on Commercial Street in 1901 while trying to save his little brother from being injured.

The Everyday Heroes of Postman’s Park, ‘His Life for his Mate’

Recounts the story of Thomas Griffin who, in 1899, was scalded to death at a Battersea sugar refinery while trying to rescue his mate.

The Everyday Heroes of Postman’s Park, Tragedy in Peckham

Recounts the story of Richard Farris, who lost his life in the Grand Surrey Canal in Peckham in 1878 while trying to save the life of a woman.

More in United Kingdom

The Barbican and the Making of the Modern Office Building – Pt. 2

The Barbican Redevelopment Scheme, comprising the Barbican Estate, Barbican Arts Centre and the office buildings around London Wall and Moorgate, is well known to people with an affection for twentieth-century architecture, and has become major cultural centre in its own right. Nevertheless, very few people are aware of how a type of plastic manufactured in rural Kent quietly revolutionised the design and construction of modern office building, in particular the curtain-walling systems that enabled open-plan offices. In the second of two viewpoints on the New Barbican, Alexander Davidson tells a story encompassing two office buildings built as part of the Barbican Redevelopment Scheme – Lee House and St Alphage House – and how the plastic Holoplast was manufactured, used in construction, and eventually came to be demonised by the City of London Corporation.