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More from Jack Dykstra

Lloyd’s Coffee House: maritime insurance and the slave trade (coffee trail 5)

As the fountainhead of maritime insurance Lloyd’s is the most famous coffeehouse. Its story is emblematic of the rise and fall of London’s coffeehouses: part of their meteoric rise was the appeal of auctions; their fall came when these public spaces turned private. Exploring Lloyd’s also reveals the coffeehouse’s deep links to the slave trade, from auctions and escaped enslaved Africans to the insuring of slave ships and their human cargo.

The Jamaica Wine House: the arrival of coffee (coffee trail 1)

The story of how coffee of arrived in London, not from Italy or America, but from the Ottoman Empire in the seventeenth century. It tasted bitter, but also of Islam and the East. This is how England learnt to love the ‘wine of Islam’ and the ‘Vertue[s] of the Coffee Drink’.

Garraway’s Coffee House: a new social space (coffee trail 2)

New coffeehouses brought not just a new drink to drink, but a new social space away from courts and universities. If you had visited in the late seventeenth century you would have heard financial deals and the latest news from across the globe. If you went to Garraway’s Coffee House in Change Alley, you may have also seen the latest scientific experiments, from tests on gases to animal dissections.

More in United Kingdom

Olaf the Destroyer

St Olaf House stands on the site of an ancient church dedicated to St Olaf. It once stood at the southern end of old London Bridge – a bridge that may have been torn down by a Viking fleet: a fleet commanded by the very same Olaf…