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More from Jack Dykstra

Garraway’s Coffee House: a new social space (coffee trail 2)

New coffeehouses brought not just a new drink to drink, but a new social space away from courts and universities. If you had visited in the late seventeenth century you would have heard financial deals and the latest news from across the globe. If you went to Garraway’s Coffee House in Change Alley, you may have also seen the latest scientific experiments, from tests on gases to animal dissections.

Button’s Coffee House: a new way to socialise (coffee trail 3)

Home to London’s wits, Button’s Coffee House held a vision for a new way to socialise and the improvement of society via the ideal coffeehouse. To achieve it, they enlisted the help of a lion to root out the city’s misdemeanours.

Lloyd’s Coffee House: maritime insurance and the slave trade (coffee trail 5)

As the fountainhead of maritime insurance Lloyd’s is the most famous coffeehouse. Its story is emblematic of the rise and fall of London’s coffeehouses: part of their meteoric rise was the appeal of auctions; their fall came when these public spaces turned private. Exploring Lloyd’s also reveals the coffeehouse’s deep links to the slave trade, from auctions and escaped enslaved Africans to the insuring of slave ships and their human cargo.

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Plague Fires

At the height of the Great Plague of London, great bonfires of rare herbs burn across the deserted city. Join Samuel Peyps in the midst of this hellish vision – a last-ditch attempt to stop the spread of disease.