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More from Tamsin Lewis

The Red Bull

A dance from Playford’s Dancing Master (1698) thought to have been named after the Red Bull Playhouse, an inn-yard theatre, built in 1605 in what is now Haywood’s Place. During the early part of the 17th Century, the theatre was used by the Queen’s Men, and their performances rivalled those at the Globe and the Fortune.
During the Civil War and Interregnum, when other theatres were closed or destroyed, the Red Bull remained open, offering illicit performances of jigs, drolls, rope-dancing and much more.
It was demolished during the early years of the Restoration, but its location, Red Bull Yard could still be seen on Ogilby’s map a few years later.

The Red Bull dance doesn’t appear in the Dancing Master until 1698, but the melody is thought to date from c1619.

More in United Kingdom

‘Pied Piper’, Willi Soukop. Elmington estate, Camberwell

The sculptural mural, ‘Pied Piper’, by Willi Soukop, was installed on the Elmington estate in Camberwell in 1959 by the London County Council. This viewpoint looks at the theme of the Pied Piper and how the LCC wanted the mural to resonate with residents, in particular, children.

The George and Tabard Inns

The George is a seventeenth-century coaching inn that stands near the site of the old Tabard Inn, where the Canterbury Tales begins. Travel back and forth between London and Canterbury happened for religious reason as well as pleasure.

Dr John Caius’s House in Smithfield

Step inside a sixteenth-century house in Smithfield.