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More from Anton Howes

Steam Locomotion Arrives!

Here, in 1803, was one of the first public demonstrations of high-pressure steam locomotion, by Cornish inventor Richard Trevithick, aka Captain Dick.

The Quaker Scientists of Plough Court

The laboratory of 2 Plough Court, hub for Quaker scientists and inventors, and an ancestor to today’s Glaxo Smith Kline.

More in United Kingdom

The History of Leake Street Graffiti Tunnel

Leake Street Graffiti Tunnel, found underneath the platforms and tracks of Waterloo Station, is London’s largest legal graffiti wall at 300-metres in length. The site gained fame after famed British street artist, Banksy, held a street art festival called Cans Festival (a play on The Cannes Film Festival) in the tunnel. Banksy had recognised the potential of the tunnel which had formerly been used as an access road for taxis to pick up passengers from the Eurostar. From the 3rd-5th May 2008, forty street artists from around the world – including Blek le Rat, Ben Eine, Sten & Lex and Vexta – transformed the grimy tunnel into a street art haven. Graffiti and street art are legally permitted in the tunnel meaning that artists can create works without fear of getting arrested by police. This ever-changing gallery now attracts street art tourists and graffiti enthusiasts from around the world and   arches adjacent to the tunnel were recently transformed into bars and restaurants. The site was even home to a temporary cinema, The Lambeth Palace, to celebrate the release of Banksy’s documentary Exit Through the Gift Shop in 2010. 

Balfron Tower & Robin Hood Gardens

Balfron Tower, Poplar. The centerpiece of the Brownfield Estate, designed by Erno Goldfinger, and lightning rod in the debate over social housing and gentrification.