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More from Ella Sbaraini

‘You ruin’d me forever’: A Suicide Letter at Hyde Park Basin

In 1798, a letter was left at the bank of Hyde Park Basin. Why had it been left there? And why did its author want it to be published? Find out about the struggles of John Cook, the butler to the Marquis of Titchfield, who died here.

A Student’s Struggles with Suicide in Victorian Cambridge

In 1849, Clare College (then Clare Hall) was rocked by a great tragedy. One of its student’s, Edward Hayman, had taken his own life. Learn of Edward’s story, and of his struggles with ‘religious melancholy’.

A Fierce Argument over the Burial of a Suicide

In 1849, the reverend of Cottenham, and the Cambridgeshire coroner, had a fierce argument about whether a man of the parish could be given a proper Christian burial. Why? Because he had taken his own life. Learn about beliefs surrounding the burial of suicides in Victorian England.

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The Death of “Snakehips” Johnson

On March 8th, 1941, the Café de Paris – ‘the safest and gayest restaurant in town’ – was destroyed in the Blitz. Among the dead was one of the most important figures in Black British jazz: Ken “Snakehips” Johnson.
This viewpoint includes extracts from ‘Snakehips Swing’ by Ken “Snakehips” Johnson and his West Indian Dance Orchestra, available on ‘Black British Swing: The African Diaspora’s Contribution To England’s Own Jazz of the 1930s and 1940s’.
[CW: war; death]