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More from Siobhán Hearne

Policing prostitution in Russia’s First World War

The Russian imperial authorities struggled to regulate the bodies of its populace in the chaos, dislocation, and destruction of the First World War. This viewpoint explores this challenge using the case study of Evgeniia Trifonova, a woman who snuck into the military barracks at Krāslava disguised as a military nurse in order to sell sex.

Hotel raids and forced registration on the police lists of prostitutes in early twentieth-century Riga

This viewpoint explores the forced registration of women onto the Russian Empire’s police lists of prostitutes in the early 1900s. In Riga, forced registration commonly occurred in the city’s hotels, and can be read as official attempts to kick back against perceived moral decline amidst urbanisation, industrialisation, and modernisation.

Resisting the regulation of prostitution in the Russian Empire

From the 1840s until 1917, prostitution was legally tolerated in the Russian Empire under a system known as regulation. This viewpoint examines how registered prostitutes resisted the regulation of prostitution and sought interaction with the authorities to achieve specific objectives. It focuses on a letter penned by 16 registered prostitutes living in Brest (now Belarus) in 1908 to examine everyday experiences of state regulation.

More in Russia

Denouncing ‘secret prostitutes’ in late imperial St Petersburg

What was a secret prostitute and why did the tsarist police deem them so concerning? This viewpoint answers these questions by examining an anonymous denunciation of a woman living at 25 Bol’shoi Prospekt in St Petersburg that was sent to the city police in 1905.