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More from Thomas Williams

The Walls of Fortress London

London’s walls may have been built by the Romans, but when the Vikings encountered them in the tenth and eleventh centuries ‘they suffered’, as the anonymous Anglo-Saxon chronicler put it, ‘more harm and injury than they ever imagined that any town-dwellers would do to them’.

King Alfred’s Trading Shore

Queenhithe is the only surviving section of the City of London’s ancient riverfront: excavations from here and neighbouring Bull Wharf have revealed evidence of London’s early medieval role in international trade – including the largest concentration of Viking artefacts in Britain outside York.

West Mynstre and the Sons of Cnut

Although it was Edward the Confessor who is most associated with Westminster abbey, the first king of England to be buried there was Harold I ‘Harefoot’, the son of King Cnut. He didn’t rest there for long…

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The Crystal Palace Dinosaurs

Walk back in time with prehistoric monsters, and discover how these Victorian sculptures were designed – a history which includes a cruel professional rivalry and a decadent dinner in a dinosaur’s stomach. [CW: suicide]