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More from Thomas Williams

King Alfred’s Trading Shore

Queenhithe is the only surviving section of the City of London’s ancient riverfront: excavations from here and neighbouring Bull Wharf have revealed evidence of London’s early medieval role in international trade – including the largest concentration of Viking artefacts in Britain outside York.

West Mynstre and the Sons of Cnut

Although it was Edward the Confessor who is most associated with Westminster abbey, the first king of England to be buried there was Harold I ‘Harefoot’, the son of King Cnut. He didn’t rest there for long…

A Passage to the Lost Docklands of Anglo-Saxon London

A weird tunnel beneath Charing Cross station traces the edge of what was once London’s riverside embankment, a waterfront that witnessed the arrival of Viking raiding fleets.

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Fanny Kelly and how Soho’s Royalty Theatre ruined her health and career

How could the launch of a theatre with the most modern, prize-winning stage machinery go so disastrously wrong?