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More from Jack Dykstra

Jonathan’s Coffee House: a financial revolution (coffee trail 4)

Jonathan’s Coffee House was at the heart of what has been dubbed ‘the financial revolution’ in late seventeenth-century London. It was home to the stock-jobbers, the scene of the 1720 South Sea Bubble, and the beginning of London’s Stock Exchange.

Button’s Coffee House: a new way to socialise (coffee trail 3)

Home to London’s wits, Button’s Coffee House held a vision for a new way to socialise and the improvement of society via the ideal coffeehouse. To achieve it, they enlisted the help of a lion to root out the city’s misdemeanours.

Lloyd’s Coffee House: maritime insurance and the slave trade (coffee trail 5)

As the fountainhead of maritime insurance Lloyd’s is the most famous coffeehouse. Its story is emblematic of the rise and fall of London’s coffeehouses: part of their meteoric rise was the appeal of auctions; their fall came when these public spaces turned private. Exploring Lloyd’s also reveals the coffeehouse’s deep links to the slave trade, from auctions and escaped enslaved Africans to the insuring of slave ships and their human cargo.

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Graffiti Art on Camden Lock Railway Bridge, created by Street Artist by John Bulley

The graffiti piece on Camden Lock Railway Bridge is considered to be the oldest surviving pieces of street art in Camden, having been created by John Bulley in 1989. Whilst working on a number of new shop signs in the area, Bulley was asked if he could come up with an idea for the Camden Lock Railway Bridge as it was about to be refurbished and repainted by British Rail. Knowing that he wanted the design to be visible from a distance and have some humour in it, Bulley used a bold typeface and photographed two men he was working with to include in his design. The resulting work features the two men who appear to be constantly painting the bridge.  The work has been repainted in recent years to freshen up the paint but using the same iconic design. Having lasted for over thirty years, the piece is considered an icon of London’s oldest pieces of street art.