Leave a Reply

More from Jack Dykstra

Garraway’s Coffee House: a new social space (coffee trail 2)

New coffeehouses brought not just a new drink to drink, but a new social space away from courts and universities. If you had visited in the late seventeenth century you would have heard financial deals and the latest news from across the globe. If you went to Garraway’s Coffee House in Change Alley, you may have also seen the latest scientific experiments, from tests on gases to animal dissections.

Jonathan’s Coffee House: a financial revolution (coffee trail 4)

Jonathan’s Coffee House was at the heart of what has been dubbed ‘the financial revolution’ in late seventeenth-century London. It was home to the stock-jobbers, the scene of the 1720 South Sea Bubble, and the beginning of London’s Stock Exchange.

Lloyd’s Coffee House: maritime insurance and the slave trade (coffee trail 5)

As the fountainhead of maritime insurance Lloyd’s is the most famous coffeehouse. Its story is emblematic of the rise and fall of London’s coffeehouses: part of their meteoric rise was the appeal of auctions; their fall came when these public spaces turned private. Exploring Lloyd’s also reveals the coffeehouse’s deep links to the slave trade, from auctions and escaped enslaved Africans to the insuring of slave ships and their human cargo.

More in United Kingdom

Henry VIII’s Lost Palaces: Bridewell Palace

Henry VIII’s main London residence from 1523 to 1530 served as a backdrop for some of the drama of the King’s Great Matter: Henry’s attempt to annul his marriage to Catherine of Aragon, so that he could marry Anne Boleyn.