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More from Jack Dykstra

Lloyd’s Coffee House: maritime insurance and the slave trade (coffee trail 5)

As the fountainhead of maritime insurance Lloyd’s is the most famous coffeehouse. Its story is emblematic of the rise and fall of London’s coffeehouses: part of their meteoric rise was the appeal of auctions; their fall came when these public spaces turned private. Exploring Lloyd’s also reveals the coffeehouse’s deep links to the slave trade, from auctions and escaped enslaved Africans to the insuring of slave ships and their human cargo.

Jonathan’s Coffee House: a financial revolution (coffee trail 4)

Jonathan’s Coffee House was at the heart of what has been dubbed ‘the financial revolution’ in late seventeenth-century London. It was home to the stock-jobbers, the scene of the 1720 South Sea Bubble, and the beginning of London’s Stock Exchange.

Button’s Coffee House: a new way to socialise (coffee trail 3)

Home to London’s wits, Button’s Coffee House held a vision for a new way to socialise and the improvement of society via the ideal coffeehouse. To achieve it, they enlisted the help of a lion to root out the city’s misdemeanours.

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Henry VIII’s Lost Palaces: Suffolk Place

Take a trip to Suffolk Place, the shortest occupied palace of the Tudor era. This lavish mansion was grand enough to host the Holy Roman Emperor, Charles V, when he visited England in 1522, while it also played host to a princely Christening.