Leave a Reply

More from Thomas Williams

King Alfred’s Trading Shore

Queenhithe is the only surviving section of the City of London’s ancient riverfront: excavations from here and neighbouring Bull Wharf have revealed evidence of London’s early medieval role in international trade – including the largest concentration of Viking artefacts in Britain outside York.

The Church of Saint Ghastly Grim

The Church of St Olave on Hart Street is one of London’s oldest medieval churches. Known to Dickens as ‘Saint Ghastly Grim’ and dedicated to a notorious Norwegian king, its likely origins lie in the Viking Age.

West Mynstre and the Sons of Cnut

Although it was Edward the Confessor who is most associated with Westminster abbey, the first king of England to be buried there was Harold I ‘Harefoot’, the son of King Cnut. He didn’t rest there for long…

More in United Kingdom

The Everyday Heroes of Postman’s Park, ‘His Life for his Mate’

Recounts the story of Thomas Griffin who, in 1899, was scalded to death at a Battersea sugar refinery while trying to rescue his mate.