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More from Thomas Williams

King Alfred’s Trading Shore

Queenhithe is the only surviving section of the City of London’s ancient riverfront: excavations from here and neighbouring Bull Wharf have revealed evidence of London’s early medieval role in international trade – including the largest concentration of Viking artefacts in Britain outside York.

A Passage to the Lost Docklands of Anglo-Saxon London

A weird tunnel beneath Charing Cross station traces the edge of what was once London’s riverside embankment, a waterfront that witnessed the arrival of Viking raiding fleets.

Viking Greenwich and a Martyr’s Death

The church of St Alfege was built on the site of the martyrdom of St Ælfheah: the archbishop of Canterbury who, having been kidnapped by Vikings and taken to their camp at Greenwich, was battered to death with animal bones…

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The Old Oak Estate

A cottage estate built by the London County Council from 1911 – ‘the culminating achievement of the Council’s venture into garden suburb planning before the First World War’.