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Palestine Place

Palestine Place was the nineteenth-century headquarters of the London Jews Society, an Anglican missionary society that worked to demonstrate the value of Christianity to Jewish populations.

‘A Couple Hold Hands in the Street’ by Stik and ‘The Crane’ by ROA, Brick Lane Street Art, London

Brick Lane, in the heart of the East End of London, is often considered one of the most famous locations in the UK for graffiti and street art. Whilst international street artists aspire to paint on Brick Lane, it is kept fresh by local artists who change the graffiti on a weekly basis. Works can be found by famous street artists from around the world, including Phlegm, Ben Eine, Banksy, Noriaki, C215, ROA, Vhils and Shepard Fairey, to name just a few. One of the most popular works of street art in the area is that of ‘A Couple Hold Hands in the Street’ on Princelet Street by local artist Stik. The piece, created in 2010, shows a woman in a niqab holding hands with a second stick figure and was voted the nation’s 17th favourite artwork in a poll in 2017. One of the other long-standing pieces in the area is The Crane on Hanbury street which was created by Belgian street artist, ROA. The work was originally intended to be a heron but was changed to a crane after ROA learnt that they were sacred to the Bengali community, who make up a significant portion of the local population. 

The site of St. Anselm’s Church, Coventry Park

A lost church, destroyed in the Second World War, leaves a strange, triangular space and a sense that something is still missing.

‘Boys Playing Football’, Peter Laszlo Peri. South Lambeth estate, Lambeth

After the Second World War, Hungarian artist Peter Laszlo Peri approached the LCC with the idea of depicting scenes of family life to ‘brighten up’ the facades of new LCC housing in Lambeth. ‘Boys Playing Football’, dates to between 1951 and 1952 and was installed on the South Lambeth estate.