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More from Thomas Williams

King Alfred’s Trading Shore

Queenhithe is the only surviving section of the City of London’s ancient riverfront: excavations from here and neighbouring Bull Wharf have revealed evidence of London’s early medieval role in international trade – including the largest concentration of Viking artefacts in Britain outside York.

The Church of Saint Ghastly Grim

The Church of St Olave on Hart Street is one of London’s oldest medieval churches. Known to Dickens as ‘Saint Ghastly Grim’ and dedicated to a notorious Norwegian king, its likely origins lie in the Viking Age.

The Lost City of Lundenwic

Excavations beneath the Royal Opera House have revealed stunning evidence of early London, both the homes and workshops of the inhabitants and also the defensive ditches that may have been built to protect against Viking attacks before the area was abandoned.

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Tabernacle Community Centre

This converted religious site provides an interesting window into the changing culture of Notting Hill in the contemporary period.