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More from Alexander Davidson

The House of the Future at Olympia London

This viewpoint focusses on a futuristic vision for plastics in architecture and interior design: Alison and Peter Smithson‘s House of the Future, which was shown at the Daily Mail Ideal Home Show at the London Olympia Exhibition Centre in 1956. The exhibition structure, containing everything from chairs made of fibreglass to bedding fashioned out of Nylon, popularised an aesthetic for the materials’ use in architectural and visual design which has lasted until the present day.

The Plastic Eggcups by Camden Lock

In this viewpoint, I tell the story of Terry Farrell & Partners’ TV-AM building (1981-83), a maverick television studios near Camden Lock. The TV-AM building, which – as the name suggests – was home to one Britain’s first breakfast television programmes, is associated with the architectural style of postmodernism and with colour in architecture and interior design. The building was substantially refurbished by architects Jacobs Webber in 2012-13 and is now home to Viacom International.

Broadcasting House and British Plastics

In this viewpoint, I tell the story of the BBC’s headquarters, its design by Val Myer and FJ Watson Hart and its magnificent recording studios. The story features angry local residents, neo-Art Deco facades, and a type of early plastic made of formaldehyde resin.

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The Old Jewry

The Old Jewry was the centre of Jewish life in medieval London. Almost all trace of the Great Synagogue and the buildings here was lost after the Edict of Expulsion in 1290.