Leave a Reply

More from Elizabeth Norton

Henry VIII’s Lost Palaces: Suffolk Place

Take a trip to Suffolk Place, the shortest occupied palace of the Tudor era. This lavish mansion was grand enough to host the Holy Roman Emperor, Charles V, when he visited England in 1522, while it also played host to a princely Christening.

Henry VIII’s Lost Palaces: Eltham Palace

Explore the remains of Henry VIII’s childhood home, a palace that also served as a Byzantine Emperor’s holiday home and housed a medieval king’s personal library. You can even take a walk through Henry VIII’s sewer system.

Henry VIII’s Lost Palaces: Hatfield Old Palace

Visit the old palace at Hatfield, childhood home to the future Elizabeth I. It was the place where she learned of her accession to the throne, in 1558, while sitting reading under an oak tree in the palace’s park.

More in United Kingdom

Historic Graffiti of St Augustine’s Tower, Hackney, London

St Augustine’s Tower is the oldest building in Hackney and can be found in the gardens of St John’s Church. This Grade I listed tower is managed by the Hackney Historic Buildings Trust and is usually open on the last Sunday of each month. A church was built on the site in the 12th century and then rebuilt in the 16th century. The church became redundant following the completion of the Church of St-John-at-Hackney in 1792 and the tower is all that remains of the 16th-century church following the demolition of the rest of the building in 1798. Although the tower was also due to be demolished it was kept in order to house the church bells until they could be moved to their new location. It is also reported that the tower stayed after the contractor employed to demolish it found it to be too difficult of a job. After climbing the narrow staircase to the top of the tower, visitors are treated to a view of the City of London whilst a variety of graffiti can be found throughout, including marks left by those visiting the tower in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and drawings of houses.