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More from Elizabeth Norton

Henry VIII’s Lost Palaces: Suffolk Place

Take a trip to Suffolk Place, the shortest occupied palace of the Tudor era. This lavish mansion was grand enough to host the Holy Roman Emperor, Charles V, when he visited England in 1522, while it also played host to a princely Christening.

Henry VIII’s Lost Palaces: Bridewell Palace

Henry VIII’s main London residence from 1523 to 1530 served as a backdrop for some of the drama of the King’s Great Matter: Henry’s attempt to annul his marriage to Catherine of Aragon, so that he could marry Anne Boleyn.

Henry VIII’s Lost Palaces: Brooke House

Brooke House has one of the saddest stories of any of Henry VIII’s lost palaces, since it was only demolished in the 1950s. Now nothing remains of the palace in which Henry VIII was reconciled to his eldest daughter, Princess Mary.

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The Inner Temple

An account of a patch of land between Fleet Street and the Thames. Now occupied residentially by judges and senior lawyers and enclosing the Inner Temple library and nearby Temple Church, the land was originally leased by the Knights Templar in the fourteenth century. Its rose garden was later – according to William Shakespeare – the place where the fifteenth century War of the Roses began.