• Beheaded at the Tower of London in 1541, Margaret Pole is one of the most famous martyrs in English History. During her lifetime, she was one of the richest magnates in England and had several properties befitting her wealth and status. This viewpoint discusses her Thames-side residence, the Erber, which stood on Dowgate Street.

  • On 5 August 1872, Christopher Rafferty shot two Chicago police officers in Mrs O’Brien’s Bar. All involved in the crime were of Irish birth or descent. Rafferty had 3 trials – being found guilty of murder each time – and he had become a celebrity of sorts by the time he was executed in 1874.

  • Here are some instructions on using Audacity. If you’re using a laptop + mic for your recording, and want a bit more control, this might be for you: Firstly, include 30 or so seconds of the recording when you aren’t talking so that you can use that to filter background noise.  All of the following

  • The Upper Cut Club in Forest Gate embodied the cockney spirit in its 1960s heyday. Owned by a local prize-fighter, the club drew high profile celebrities and underworld figures. The club’s brief run introduced African American acts including Otis Redding, Jimi Hendrix, and Nina Simone to East London youth. It is believed that Hendrix wrote the iconic ‘Purple Haze’ backstage.

  • George’s viewpoints will offer glimpses into the history of charity and community over the past few hundred years. They’ll include the story of Thomas Guy, who used his enormous wealth to found a new hospital just south of the Thames in the 1720s. Guy’s Hospital is a leading medical institution and still an impressive site today, so why was his statue hidden from sight in 2020?

  • Thomas is a historian of the early Middle Ages and a former curator at the British Museum’s Department of Coins and Medals. He worked as project curator for the major international exhibition Vikings: Life and Legend (British Museum 2014) and is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London. His books Viking Britain (2017) and Viking London (2019) are published by William Collins.

  • Anna’s viewpoints will be exploring the literal and metaphorical blooming of flower culture in nineteenth-century London, from the rise of the cut-flower trade in Covent Garden and the flower girls of Piccadilly Circus, to the working-class flower shows of Bloomsbury and Peckham. Flowers were abundant in late-Victorian London, one commentator remarking in 1881 that it had become ‘a city of summer flowers, a floral London, where the beauties of the garden are transplanted to balcony, window sill, and even to house top’.

  • Joshua is a writer, photographer and tour guide, focusing on the Art Deco and Modernist architecture of London’s suburbs. Since 2011 he has run the Modernism in Metro-Land website and has just published “A Guide to Modernism in Metro-Land”, the pocket guide to the suburbs’ hidden architecture. He is also contributor to “100 20th-Century Gardens and Landscapes”, and “The Alternative Guide to the London Boroughs”.

  • Stories, memories, etc. are extremely potent. By placing them in the physical world, that potency is unleashed. When a listener experiences a place through a viewpoint, the place becomes emotionally charged for that person. Not just for the duration of the viewpoint, but forever. Whether it’s a building, a bridge or a tree, the effect is the same: having listened to a viewpoint, the object awakens – permanently – onto the listener’s ’emotional landscape’, to coin a phrase.

  • We talk about Mike Leigh’s ‘wild’ film Naked, set in a real-but-not-real ’90s London, and how it documents that the city is always both eternal and ever-changing. Finally, Tom tantalises us with hints at his next projects: a voyage around UK’s nuclear power stations, and a new book about the ‘plague walks’ he made during lockdown in 2020.

  • We’re delighted to offer Heritage Alliance members 50% off our Placecloud commission on street view tours ticket sales until the end of 2021, for those who sign up by midnight on Christmas Eve 2020. This is our way of offering support to the heritage sector after a torrid year.

  • George and Rafaela range across self-assembling cathedrals, egoic skyscrapers, the pickling of a serial-killer’s head, professional wailing women, and more. We hear about Rafaela’s education in criminology and forensic medicine, and her turn from science to the world of history and culture.