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More from Siobhán Hearne

Railways and prostitution

The construction of the Trans-Siberian railway increased the visibility of prostitution in Siberia. This viewpoint explores the impact of transportation development and war on efforts to police prostitution in the Siberian region.

Controlling venereal diseases in the Russian Imperial Navy

Venereal diseases in the military were extremely concerning for the Russian imperial authorities. This viewpoint examines responses to epidemic rates of venereal infection in one port of the Empire, the Port of Emperor Alexander III in Libava (now Karosta, near Liepāja in Latvia)

Resisting the regulation of prostitution in the Russian Empire

From the 1840s until 1917, prostitution was legally tolerated in the Russian Empire under a system known as regulation. This viewpoint examines how registered prostitutes resisted the regulation of prostitution and sought interaction with the authorities to achieve specific objectives. It focuses on a letter penned by 16 registered prostitutes living in Brest (now Belarus) in 1908 to examine everyday experiences of state regulation.

More in Latvia

Policing prostitution in Russia’s First World War

The Russian imperial authorities struggled to regulate the bodies of its populace in the chaos, dislocation, and destruction of the First World War. This viewpoint explores this challenge using the case study of Evgeniia Trifonova, a woman who snuck into the military barracks at Krāslava disguised as a military nurse in order to sell sex.