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More from Jack Dykstra

The Jamaica Wine House: the arrival of coffee (coffee trail 1)

The story of how coffee of arrived in London, not from Italy or America, but from the Ottoman Empire in the seventeenth century. It tasted bitter, but also of Islam and the East. This is how England learnt to love the ‘wine of Islam’ and the ‘Vertue[s] of the Coffee Drink’.

Jonathan’s Coffee House: a financial revolution (coffee trail 4)

Jonathan’s Coffee House was at the heart of what has been dubbed ‘the financial revolution’ in late seventeenth-century London. It was home to the stock-jobbers, the scene of the 1720 South Sea Bubble, and the beginning of London’s Stock Exchange.

Button’s Coffee House: a new way to socialise (coffee trail 3)

Home to London’s wits, Button’s Coffee House held a vision for a new way to socialise and the improvement of society via the ideal coffeehouse. To achieve it, they enlisted the help of a lion to root out the city’s misdemeanours.

More in United Kingdom

Folkmoot

From the early sixteenth centuries the area around St Pauls Cathedral including the famous Paternoster Row, were the centre of publishing trade in England. Printers and booksellers working from shops here spread ideas and information across the country.