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More from Madeleine Pelling

Graffiti at Wellclose Square Prison

Although Wellclose Square Prison is now lost to history, the wooden walls of one of the cells survive at the Museum of London and are covered in graffiti documenting the distant voices of the incarcerated in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Discovering Historical Graffiti at the Tower of London

In 1791, workmen at the Tower of London discovered extensive historical graffiti left by prisoners – including the ill-fated Lady Jane Grey – centuries earlier.

Sir Ashton Lever’s Lost Museum

In the eighteenth century, Leicester House was transformed to a since-lost museum. Among its curiosities was a stuffed Hippopotamus and objects brought to Britain by the colonist Captain James Cook.

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Lloyd’s Coffee House: maritime insurance and the slave trade (coffee trail 5)

As the fountainhead of maritime insurance Lloyd’s is the most famous coffeehouse. Its story is emblematic of the rise and fall of London’s coffeehouses: part of their meteoric rise was the appeal of auctions; their fall came when these public spaces turned private. Exploring Lloyd’s also reveals the coffeehouse’s deep links to the slave trade, from auctions and escaped enslaved Africans to the insuring of slave ships and their human cargo.