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More from Isabella Rosner

The Gravel Pit Chapel

The Gravel Pit Chapel was home to a radical religious congregation, now buried in a walled-off graveyard in Hackney.

Palestine Place

Palestine Place was the nineteenth-century headquarters of the London Jews Society, an Anglican missionary society that worked to demonstrate the value of Christianity to Jewish populations.

The Perwich School

In the 17th century, the Perwich school was one of the biggest and most renowned girls’ schools in the London area and the country. The school taught girls from middling and elite families how to be accomplished and successful wives, mothers, and women in their own right.

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The Red Bull

A dance from Playford’s Dancing Master (1698) thought to have been named after the Red Bull Playhouse, an inn-yard theatre, built in 1605 in what is now Haywood’s Place. During the early part of the 17th Century, the theatre was used by the Queen’s Men, and their performances rivalled those at the Globe and the Fortune.
During the Civil War and Interregnum, when other theatres were closed or destroyed, the Red Bull remained open, offering illicit performances of jigs, drolls, rope-dancing and much more.
It was demolished during the early years of the Restoration, but its location, Red Bull Yard could still be seen on Ogilby’s map a few years later.

The Red Bull dance doesn’t appear in the Dancing Master until 1698, but the melody is thought to date from c1619.