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More from Rosie Whitcombe

Guy’s Hospital

On 1st October 1815, John Keats enrolled at Guy’s Hospital to undertake his medical training. Though he did well at Guy’s, Keats eventually gave up his studies to become a poet. Listen to find out more about Keats’s time spent training in the medical profession, including details about some of his more grisly duties.

Well Walk

In December 1818, Tom Keats, the youngest of the three Keats brothers, died at number 1 Well Walk. In the final stages of his consumption, Tom was nursed by his elder brother, the poet John Keats. Listen to find out more about how Keats undertook his responsibilities as Tom’s sole carer.

More in United Kingdom

The site of St. Anselm’s Church, Coventry Park

A lost church, destroyed in the Second World War, leaves a strange, triangular space and a sense that something is still missing.

The Barbican and the Making of the Modern Office Building – Pt. 1

The Barbican Redevelopment Scheme, comprising the Barbican Estate, Barbican Arts Centre and the office buildings around London Wall and Moorgate, is well known to people with an affection for twentieth-century architecture, and has become major cultural centre in its own right. Nevertheless, very few people are aware of how a type of plastic manufactured in rural Kent quietly revolutionised the design and construction of modern office building, in particular the curtain-walling systems that enabled open-plan offices. In the first of two viewpoints on the New Barbican, Alexander Davidson tells a story encompassing two office buildings built as part of the Barbican Redevelopment Scheme – Lee House and St Alphage House – and how the plastic Holoplast was manufactured, used in construction, and eventually came to be demonised by the City of London Corporation.